social theory

Emancipation, New Sensibility, and the Challenge of a New Era: Arnold Farr

 

This November, scholars and activists from around the world will gather at UK to attend the 5th Biennial Conference of the International Herbert Marcuse Society. Arnold Farr, a philosopher and social theorist here at the University of Kentucky, is organizing the conference, which seeks to examine “Emancipation, New Sensibility, and the Challenge of a New Era.”

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman.

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The Origins of Religious Disbelief: Will Gervais

According to recent research, approximately one in five Americans don’t identify with a religion. Will Gervais, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology, studies the origins of atheism, and is a recent addition to UK's faculty. In January 2013, he co-authored an article, "The Origins of Religious Disbelief," in the journal, Trends in cognitive sciences. Co-written with Ara Norenzayan from the University of British Columbia, the article defines four different types of atheism and their origins. 

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UK Libraries Event to Feature Journalist John Egerton

The upcoming University of Kentucky Libraries Annual Dinner will feature and recognize this year's Award for Intellectual Achievement recipient, journalist and author John W. Egerton.

Table, Map, and Text: Writing in France circa 1600

Tom Conley, Harvard University Table, Map, and Text: Writing in France circa 1600

Committee on Social Theory Spring Lecture Series Friday, March 8, 2013 - University of Kentucky

Mapping the Abstract: Jenny Rice

Most of us associate mapping with cartography, but that's not always the case. The Committee on Social Theory is presenting a graduate-level course on mapping this semester and Jenny Rice, assistant professor in the Division of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Media, is one of its four instructors. Jeremy Crampton, Jeffrey Peters, and Susan Larson are also teaching sections of the class, each talking about a different aspect of mapping. In this interview, Rice talked about the ways we can 'map' ideas and arguments. 

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

 

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

Philosophy and Community: Justin Spinks

On April 6th, 2013, the UK Department of Philosophy will host its 16th annual Philosophy Graduate Student Conference. Organizer Justin Spinks is bringing together scholars and students to ponder and discuss the relationship between Philosophy and Community. Held in WT Young Auditorium for a full day, the conference is free and open to the public. Spinks also talks about his involvement with UK's Committee on Social Theory and how their interdisciplinary nature has inspired him to apply his academic knowledge to issues outside of academia.

This podcast was produced by Cheyenne Hohman

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License.

The End of Wonder in the Age of Whatever

Dr. Michael Wesch, a cultural anthropologist and media ecologist at Kansas State University, will be giving a talk entitled "The End of Wonder in the Age of Whatever" presented by the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching (CELT). Dr. Wesch regularly teaches large classes and was the 2008 U.S. Professor of the Year for Doctoral and Research Universities selected by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 
 
He will be talking about creating a sense of "wonder" in the classroom and giving students the gift of "big questions." Professor Wesch's visit strives to inspire UK faculty and foster a dialogue on campus around topics such as teaching large classes and using new media and technologies in the classroom to nurture student curiosity and exploration as they pursue authentic and relevant questions. 
 

New media and technology present us with an overwhelming bounty of tools for connection, creativity, collaboration, and knowledge creation - a true "Age of Whatever" where anything seems possible. But any enthusiasm about these remarkable possibilities is immediately tempered by that other "Age of Whatever" - an age in which people feel increasingly disconnected, disempowered, tuned out, and alienated. Such problems are especially prevalent in education, where the Internet often enters our classrooms as a distraction device rather than a tool for learning.

What is needed more than ever is to inspire our students to wonder, to nurture their appetite for curiosity, exploration, and contemplation. It is our responsibility to help them attain an insatiable appetite and pursue big, authentic, and relevant questions so that they can harness and leverage the bounty of possibility, rediscover the "end" or purpose of wonder, and stave off the historical end of wonder.

Date: 
Tuesday, March 19, 2013 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm
Location: 
WT Young Auditorium
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Table, Map and Text: Writing in France circa 1600

Tom Conley is Lowell Professor in the Departments of Romance Languages and Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard University. Conley studies relations of space and writing in literature, cartography, and cinema. His work moves to and from early modern France and issues in theory and interpretation in visual media. In 2003, Dr. Conley won a Guggenheim Fellowship for his work in topography and literature in Renaissance France.

Date: 
Friday, March 8, 2013 - 2:00pm to 4:00pm
Location: 
Lexmark Room, Main Building
Type of Event (for grouping events):

Gabriel’s Map: Cartography and Corpography in Modern War

Dr. Derek Gregory University of British Columbia

January 25, 2013 - Social Theory Lecture "Gabriel’s Map: Cartography and Corpography in Modern War"

16th Annual University of Kentucky Philosophy Graduate Student Conference

The College of Arts & Sciences and the Committee on Social Theory presents the 16th Annual University of Kentucky Philosophy Graduate Student Conference. The conference is also co-sponsored by The Graduate School at the University of Kentucky. While all academic papers in any area of philosophy will be considered, preference will be given to those addressing the broad themes of the intersection and relation between philosophy and community, culture, and society.  Such themes may include: What is philosophy's proper relationship to the community?  How can philosophy (or humanities/academia in general) better relate itself, or communicate its concerns, to the greater community?  What are some philosophical conceptions of community?  And so on.  All quality papers in any philosophical "style," whether "analytic," "historical,"  or "continental," will be considered.  Papers of an interdisciplinary nature are strongly encouraged.
 
Deadline for submission: February 8th, 2013.
 
Submission Guidelines: Papers and abstracts should be prepared for blind review. 
 
Please submit the following as separate documents: 
 
a) cover page with author's name, title of paper, word count of paper, institutional affiliation, and contact information (including email, phone number, and mailing address) 
b) an abstract of no more than 300 words 
c) the paper itself, double spaced, of no more than 3500 words. Word, pdf, and rtf are all acceptable formats.
 
All submissions and queries should be emailed to: justin.spinks@uky.edu.
Date: 
Saturday, April 6, 2013 - 9:00am to 5:00pm
Location: 
WT Young Auditorium
Type of Event (for grouping events):

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